The Resource Reforming old age security : effects and alternatives

Reforming old age security : effects and alternatives

Label
Reforming old age security : effects and alternatives
Title
Reforming old age security : effects and alternatives
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
The federal government announced in its 2012 budget its intention to increase the age of eligibility for old age security and the guaranteed income supplement from 65 to 67 years. The increase will be introduced gradually, beginning in 2023. When the policy is fully implemented in 2030, it will increase the net revenues of the federal government by $7.1 billion per year, but reduce net provincial revenues by $638 million (in constant 2014 dollars). Assuming no change in labour and savings behaviour, delaying the date of eligibility will also increase the percentage of individuals aged 65 and 66 years who are in the low-income group, from 6 percent to 17 percent (for an additional 100,000 low-income seniors in this age group), and will be most harmful to low-income seniors and to women. Alternative reforms to old age security could make it possible to achieve net gains for public finances without having such large negative impacts on the low-income rate among seniors
Citation source
In: Canadian tax journal = Revue fiscale canadienne. - Toronto. - Vol. 63 (2015),
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Clavet, N-J.
Geographic coverage
North America
Language note
English
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • tax reform
  • old age provision
  • pension
  • public finance
  • federal income tax
  • provincial tax
Label
Reforming old age security : effects and alternatives
Instantiates
Publication
Label
Reforming old age security : effects and alternatives
Publication

Library Locations

    • IBFD Library AmsterdamBorrow it
      Rietlandpark 301, Amsterdam, 1019 DW, NL
      52.37366609999999 4.9336932
Processing Feedback ...